All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Yesterday
  2. Tracey Windsor

    CMC 2018 Waiver

    Agree.
  3. kate243

    CMC 2018 Waiver

    I have read and do agree
  4. Last week
  5. sevydrassel

    CMC 2018 Waiver

    Read and understood.
  6. garhutch

    CMC 2018 Waiver

    Read & agree
  7. Lorne Ross

    CMC 2018 Waiver

    Read and agree
  8. chris Johnston

    CMC 2018 Waiver

    read and agree
  9. BobGL1100

    CMC 2018 Waiver

    Agree
  10. coco1

    CMC 2018 Waiver

    Read i agree
  11. until
    Victoria has invited us to join them for the weekend or just drop in for a pot luck on Saturday.
  12. Sad to learn of this! Condolences to family, friends and all those who's lives he touched
  13. Loss of life has a way of putting life in perspective for us. We're reminded of what's really important and just how precious time is. Our sympathy and prayers to the families and many friends of Gerald. Mike and Mary
  14. Sadly we retire #75015 for Gerald Davidson who passed away Jan 14, 2018. Our deepest sympathies to his family and friends. Irma GERALD DAVIDSON It is with great sadness Gerald Francis Davidson, passed, January 14, 2018. In Clinton Ontario with many friends left behind, remember the good times and when you have Tim Hortons think of him. Will be sadly missed by, Joyce Taylor, Kimberly Rogers, Macoy Rogers, Laura Lechner (Partner)
  15. Earlier
  16. Norm LeBlanc

    CMC 2018 Waiver

    Read and agree
  17. havok

    CMC 2018 Waiver

    Read and agreed
  18. A Pleasant Surprise A couple of months ago I noticed a posting on a Facebook group for Adventure riders that was offering a discount on Siima riding gear in exchange for “an honest review”. It was posted by an account with the name Giorgos Siima. Intrigued, I contacted him by private message about the offer right away. Giorgos Evripidou responded quickly, was very approachable and excited to talk to me about his line of jackets and pants. He is the owner and designer of Siima riding gear based out of Nicosia, Cyprus and a big fan of motorcycling. As you can see he has three varieties of riding gear available, but it was the Sibirsky Super Adventure jacket and pants that I requested to do a hands-on review of because it stands out to me as an adaptable system for true 4 season riding that can be had at a reasonable price. Bargain Pricing The jacket sells for 289.99 Euros or roughly $357 US, shipping included (before Giorgos gives you a 20% discount when you use promo code SIBIRSKY20). That would put it lower priced than a direct competitor quality jacket like the Rev’it Tornado 2. The Rev’it does have better quality armor in it but lacks some of the other Sibirsky features as you’ll see. The Sibirsky Jacket System Features The Jacket appears to be a typical 600D ballistic textile variety on the surface with reflective striping tastefully blended into the lines of the shoulders and arms, front and back. Fit and Comfort Add to that the adjustable cinches on the arms, waist and wrist areas, along with a removable collar that covers the lower and mid-neck area and it’s starting to get more interesting. The cinches allowed me to adjust the jacket to fit snug but not uncomfortably tight. It left a little room to spare for extra inner layers if desired. There are pleated, accordion-like sections of material on the elbows, knees and lower back of the Sibirsky system to keep those areas from stretching and bulging out over time from the stress of a typical riding position. It looks like it would hold up well, but only time will really tell. I have a 40-inch chest and a 175 lb muscular build, but I’m short at only 5’7” tall. Finding riding gear that fits me well is extremely challenging. To complicate matters, when I had my wife help take my measurements to order the Sibirsky jacket she misread the tape and told me my chest was 42 inches. Maybe she was trying to pad my ego? That’s how I ended up with an XXL jacket on Giorgos’ recommendation. I’ve never been an XXL anything in my life but surprisingly the jacket still fits me quite well. If I could do it over again I think I would have gone with the XL instead just to tighten up the fit a bit. The XXL leaves me some room for additional layers if I want them which isn’t a problem really. You’ll find the Siima jackets fit smaller than US sizes do, so make sure if you order one that you consult with Giorgos beforehand… and give him your actual and correct measurements. Collar and Wrist Seals The removable collar doesn’t have neoprene on the sealing edge to block out water, but it does have soft, felt lining it and it’s comfortably snug without causing any chafing. The adjustable wrists also have the same felt lip on them, but I don’t care for the velcro adjuster there because it left a bulge when I latched it tight to my wrist. This probably wouldn’t have happened if I had ordered the XL jacket instead so I can’t really hold it against Siima. A Couple of Misses I noticed that the stitching isn’t doubled anywhere on the jacket or pants, making me wonder about the life expectancy of the Sibirsky, especially if it’s used for serious off-road riding and takes a few slides across the dirt during spills off the bike. Double stitching is commonly found on the higher end brands for this very reason. Neither is there any superfabric or double thick sections of nylon on the elbows, shoulders or other high stress/impact areas of the jacket. Similarly, the knees, hips, and rump on the pants aren’t reinforced, but there are patches of leather sewn into the crotch and inner knee to help with wear. Excellent Hot Weather Mesh Venting The jacket has large openings on both sides of the lower 75% area of the jacket that can be opened up a little bit or all the way down to the waist and pinned back using snaps to allow air to flow into the jacket’s inner mesh liner and cool the wearer. If you find that’s not good enough while riding in temps rising high above 100 degrees just continue undoing the zipper and you’ll find that it removes the entire outer layer on the front, lower portion of the chest area and most of the back too. There’s even a strip attached to it that runs along the inside of both arms. This allows you to remove more than half of the outer textile layer of the jacket leaving double layered mesh in its place. You can see how the outermost green layer is gone in the photo above leaving the black mesh in its place. I haven’t seen a comparably priced jacket on the market that will flow more air through it than this one, including the Rev’it Tornado 2 which is saying a lot. It’s the strongest selling point for the Sibirsky for sure. When I removed the outer layer to test the cooling properties I was very impressed with how well it worked. Excellent design. Water Reservoir Pouch In the photo above you’ll notice a large grommet with a zipper above it. This is a pocket designed to hold up to a 3 Litre water reservoir and the grommet would be where the drinking tube exits to reach the rider’s mouth. A water reservoir isn’t included with the jacket, and I don’t see any loops to anchor down the drinking tube anywhere on the jacket either. Removable Thermal Layer The Sibirsky certainly has hot weather riding covered, but it also comes with a removable thermal liner that snaps in and out of place for colder weather riding. The pants come with the same thermal layer material snapped in them at the bottom and zippered at the top. I was very skeptical about a jacket with so many zippers and ample mesh lining being able to keep me warm in cold weather and had to put it to the ultimate test: a Canadian winter motorcycle ride! I may have subconsciously tried to set the Sibirsky up for failure by venturing out in 26 degrees F weather on a Ural sidecar bike demo. No windshield or anything to block the windchill from hitting me straight in the Sibirsky, so to speak. Underneath the jacket, I only wore a turtleneck cotton shirt (mostly to cover my neck) along with a standard thermal underwear top and bottom layer… that’s it! Let’s see how that Siima thermal layer really works, eh? Four Season Gear I went out at highway speed for a good 40-minute ride on the Ural and to my amazement, I stayed warm! By the end, I was starting to notice a slight bit of a cool sensation touching on my chest area. I believe it was because the zippers were beginning to freeze up and transfer cold through my turtleneck and thermal top. If I had actually worn a sensible layer of fleece or even a hoodie I doubt I would have felt anything at all. The Sibirsky pants didn’t transfer any cold whatsoever to their credit. I was very impressed that even with the deck overwhelmingly stacked against it the Siima gear stood up to a thorough cold weather test. I should have known that with a name that translates to Siberian, the Sibirsky would be suited to cold weather, eh? FYI, Siima is Finnish for “line” or “path”. Zippers All the zips are YKK quality ones and move well without snagging. There are flaps covering every zipper seam that keep the wind out and warmth in if you want to go that way. Armor There are CE Level 1 pads in the chest, elbows, and shoulders along with a Level 2 equivalent one covering the back. They definitely aren’t the same high-end quality you would find in a brand like Klim or Rev’it as you can see in the photos, but they do feel like they would make some difference in a crash. The pockets that the armor sits in could accommodate better quality padding if you bought some to install in the jacket and pants yourself. The mesh backing on the ones in the arms, legs, and shoulders help with moisture wicking, but the large one on the back and those on the chest are basically just big, solid chunks of rubber that could make you sweat more in high heat riding. Good thing you can open those huge vents to compensate. Pockets There are four pockets on the front and one on the inside vest area. None are waterproof sadly, but they are a good size to hold wallets, cell phone, passports or whatever else you’d typically carry. If you remove the lower portion outer shell of the jacket for hot weather riding you’ll lose all four pockets and only be left with the inner vest pocket. Rain Gear Pouch A large pocket is located on the jacket’s lower back around waist level that surprisingly will hold the waterproof rain gear (jacket and pants) that come included with the Sibirsky. This pocket is fully detachable if you get tired of wearing it back there and is a nice compact storage pouch for your rain gear whether attached to the jacket or not. Water Resistant The Sibirsky on its own is at best water resistant and good for light rain only. You’ll have to throw on this waterproof layer if you are out in the steady or heavy rain to avoid getting soaked. The waterproof top and bottom attach to the jacket and pants quickly using snaps to stay in place. The jacket has a hood rolled up in the tall collar that would come in handy. Some people prefer the waterproof liner to be installed inside the jacket and pants to protect it in a fall or crash, especially for off-road adventure riding. For myself, I can’t stand trying to feed waterproof liners into the arms and legs of riding gear and I find hooking up the buttons or snaps that hold them in place internally, irritating. Even more so when you’re pulled over on the side of the road trying to put on your rain gear while the rain is beating down on you. At times like that, I recognize the wisdom of just wearing the waterproof layer over the top of your jacket and pants. Feel free to disagree if you like, but I see this as a plus for the Sibirsky system over the Rev’it Tornado 2 internal waterproof liner. If the Sibirsky waterproof outer layer does get damaged in a fall, Giorgos told me it would only cost $30 to replace. I would much prefer the Sibirsky have a breathable, waterproof, Gore-Tex outer shell, but that would ruin the bargain pricing aspect of it for sure. Where’s the Hi-Viz? I think it would have been prudent to put some reflective stripes on the waterproof outer layer or at least some hi-viz colors since you really want to be easily seen in heavy rain by other drivers. The dark green and black rain suit matches the Sibirsky jacket and pants nicely, but style isn’t everything. Attaching Jacket to Pants There’s an 8 inch long zipper and some snaps to connect the Sibirsky jacket and pants together at the waist to inhibit wind from sneaking up inside the jacket while riding. This zipper appears to be the same kind most other manufacturers use to attach the top and bottom layers together so it’s possible you could intermarry the Sibirsky to other brands. I didn’t have anything on hand to test this theory, unfortunately. The Verdict? I’m sold on the Sibirsky jacket. It’s worth the asking price. Specs Manufacturer: Siima MotoWear Price (When Tested): $350 before 20% discount Made In: China, Designed in Cyprus Alternative models & colors: None Sizes: S / M / L / XL / XXL / XXXL Review Date: April 2018 Pros Good protection from the elements Good visibility Lots of pockets including a drinking water reservoir and rain gear storage pouch Includes a waterproof outer layer and removable interior thermal liner Very versatile and outstanding air flow capability Affordable Excellent customer service Cons Single stitching may limit usage and longevity Waterproof layer has no reflective striping or hi viz coloring Armor included isn’t of the highest quality Limited sizing and color options Heavy As I mentioned I would make some changes to sizing, add double stitching, some superfabric on the knees and elbows and likely upgrade the armor, but these aren’t deal breakers by any stretch. For a budget conscious buyer, I think Siima is a sure winner and I look forward to more in-depth testing this summer in warmer temperatures. I’ll be holding on to this gear for a while. Siima Convertible Gloves Coming Soon Giorgos informed me that he’s close to releasing a Super Adventure Glove in the next couple of months, so keep your eyes open for that too. The photo above is just one incarnation he’s testing and may not be the style he settles on. The post Siima Sibirsky Super Adventure Riding Jacket: Hands On Review appeared first on Web Bike World. Click here to view the full article
  19. Good Value Riding Pants Siima MotoWear is a motorcycle riding gear company, owned and operated by a passionate designer named Giorgos Evripidou in Nicosia, Cyprus. If you’ve never heard of them before don’t worry, you’re not alone. I only encountered Siima for the first time myself a couple of months ago. I “met” Giorgos online thanks to a posting he had made on an adventure rider Facebook group looking for volunteers to test out his Sibirsky Super Adventure Riding Gear. I took the bait and got myself a set of Sibirsky Super Adventure Riding gear to review as soon as I could. Giorgos was easy to communicate with online and took the time to make sure I got the best fit I possibly could. Shipping Shipping was included in the price of the gear and it arrived all the way from Cyprus in about a week or so. Not bad coming from so far away. Construction and Design These pants are made of the same 600D ballistic nylon textile as the matching Sibirsky jacket you can buy separately or as a package. The jacket and pants both have the same kind of removable thermal liner that secures in place using a zipper at the waist and buttons at the ankle areas. The inner liner material behind the nylon is double mesh to allow excellent airflow when vents are opened for rider comfort. Priced Better Than Comparables They’re a great price costing 160 Euros or roughly $195 US. (You can get a 20% discount from Giorgos by using the coupon code SIBIRSKY20 at checkout time when you order your pants online). This means these pants are a fantastic deal compared to other comparables on the market. Unlike the jacket, you can’t remove large sections of the outer material to cool yourself in hot weather riding, but don’t worry the pants have excellent venting too. Airflow Venting There are two long zippers on the front of the thigh area located on either side of the large cargo pockets that can be opened up to provide excellent airflow. On the back of the thighs, there are long zippers to open as exhaust ports. General Appearance I really like the tasteful lines and colors chosen for the pants and the highlights of silver-colored reflective material found on the knees, thighs, calf and heel areas. In addition to the two cargo pockets, there are hand pockets on either hip that have a zipper and velcro to seal them shut. The liner on the inside of these pockets appears to be waterproof material. Longevity? I noticed that there is only single stitching on the pants and the high wear areas around the knees, in particular, aren’t reinforced with extra material or superfabric like you would find on a Klim for example. It’s understandable since these pants cost about 10 times less than those big brand name ones though, it does make me wonder how they would hold up in a slide or crash. The other side of that argument is that you could replace the pants 10 times before ending up paying what you would for the Klim ones. I suppose it just depends on how rough and how often you ride whether these are issues for you. Food for thought. The crotch and inner knee areas do have leather patches sewn onto them to help with chafing wear typical of rubbing on the seat or sides of the bike frame. Armor There is CE level 1 equivalent armor in both hips and knee areas of the pants. They look like they just barely qualify as that level of protection, but I suppose they would still make a small difference in a crash. They are mesh covered and shouldn’t make you sweat too badly in hot weather. It probably would be a good idea to upgrade these with better quality protective padding. The low purchase price of these pants makes that feasible. Fit and Comfort My 34 inch waist is easily accommodated in a size Medium Sibirsky pant, but my 26-inch inseam is a huge problem when it comes to the length (or lack thereof) I need. The knee armor never lines up with my knee cap and unfortunately, there’s no short sizing option available. Giorgos warned me about this, but I decided to get the pants anyway and see how it would all shake out. Short people problems… As I hoped, the flared lower portion of the pants have a zipper and velcro flaps that work together to hold the material tight against my calf/boots. I was able to hike the pant material upwards before closing the flaps, thusly locking the knee armor further up the leg in a position where it belongs over my knees. The net result is a fair bit of material bunched up as you can see in the photos, but the pants feel comfortable and do what they’re supposed to do. I found these pants fit too tight when I wore them over my jeans, but if I remove the thermal liner then they fit fine while wearing jeans underneath. Waist Adjustment The pants have velcro adjustment straps on both sides of the hips allowing you take in or let out material in fitting them to your individual waistline. The medium pants will range from about 33 to 35 inches this way. Regardless, you’re best to consult directly with Giorgos to get the best fit available before ordering. He knows his gear well and will happily advise you on fitment. The fly has a zipper and a large fold over flap that is secured shut using velcro in order to keep the wind from coming through and subjecting your most tender bits to windchill. It worked perfectly in my sub-zero field testing. This image shows how they look on someone with a more typical 29-inch inseam. You can see they are some sharp looking pants when they aren’t all bunched up on my short legs. The pants in the picture seem to be more green than the black mine are though. You’ll notice the accordion-like pleats that are found in the lower back/rump area to allow stretching and better conformity without producing permanent bulging over time. This same design is used in the knee area to keep things fitting tight… not that I personally need it! Note the zipper used to attach the pants and jacket together is visible just above the accordion pleats in the photo above. Road Testing I decided to test the pants out on a cold March morning that more closely resembles winter than spring. The temperature was 26 F and there was plenty of snow on the ground. Luckily a local Ural sidecar dealership was doing demo rides and I got in on that to see how effective Siima’s 4 season riding gear would perform. With zero fairing protection on the Ural, I got the full windchill effect during my 40-minute ride at highway speed and the Sibirsky pants didn’t even flinch. I was very happy with how the wind and cold wasn’t a factor whatsoever. Underneath the pants, I was only wearing my usual cotton briefs and some thermal full-length underwear. That’s it. There’s no doubt about the validity of the 4 season claims of this gear in my mind. I’m confident that the venting in these pants would make summer riding very comfortable once the thermal liner is removed. Water Proofing The Sibirsky pants and jacket are only water resistant on their own, but included is an outer layer you can attach using snaps that is fully waterproof rain gear. I much prefer this to liners that install on the inside of the pants because I find them difficult to install. Especially when combined with a second thermal lining or trying to install it standing on the side of the road when an unexpected downpour is encountered. The downside to this waterproof outer layer is the dark color scheme and lack of reflective material. While it’s nice how it matches the pants, it’s not the best idea to wear dark colors out riding in heavy rain. Very Limited Colors and Styles The Sibirsky pants are only available in green and black color schemes and there’s no women-specific version offered. Good thing those are my favorite colors and I’m male. Sorry ladies. Siima is focused on keeping things simple for now in order to ensure the cost of manufacturing stays economical. They’re a small fish competing in a very big pond with some large sharks after all and they have to operate lean and mean as such. What’s the Verdict? I will definitely be wearing the Sibirsky riding gear in the hot summer weather this year and loving it! This will be a welcomed change from my current leather gear. Specs Manufacturer: Siima MotoWear Price (When Tested): $195 before 20% discount Made In: China, Designed in Cyprus Alternative models & colors: NA Sizes: XS / S / M / L / XL / XXL Review Date: April 2018 Pros Good protection from the elements Good visibility thanks to ample reflective striping 4 pockets (2 waterproof ones) Includes a waterproof outer layer and removable interior thermal liner Very versatile and good air flow capability Affordable Excellent customer service Cons Single stitching may limit usage and longevity Armor included isn’t of the highest quality Limited sizing and color options Be sure to read my review of the Siima Sibirsky Super Adventure jacket as well if you’re in the market. Siima had the goal of creating affordable and convertible riding gear that could suit multiple rider needs, and I think they succeeded for the most part. Yes, there are a few things I would change about the Sibirsky Super Adventure, but nothing drastic. For the features you get at this price I think it’s worth your hard earned money if you’re a rider on a budget and can’t afford to buy from Klim or Rukka. The Sibirsky offers protection from the wind, cold and rain to the wearer and buying this gear has the added charm of helping support one of the “little guys” that keep the big, mainstream manufacturers honest. I like that. I also like that not everyone out there will be outfitted in Siima gear and I can feel somewhat alternative and unique that way. Coming Soon From Siima You’ll want to keep an ear to the ground because Giorgos told me he’s been developing a matching set of convertible gloves to go with the Sibirsky gear and it should hit the market in the next few months. Note: The photo above is one of a few different versions being tested now by Giorgios and may not necessarily be what the end product looks like. The post Siima Sibirsky Super Adventure Pants: Hands On Review appeared first on Web Bike World. Click here to view the full article
  20. jules

    CMC 2018 Waiver

    Read and agreed
  21. Storm Chaser

    User name

    Hi Mikael Not sure why you were purged. There is an annual purge every year by each chapter by the 1st Officers of members that have not been active over a 1 year time span. It would appear that you have been purged twice since 2008 when you joined. I am very happy to see that you are back and interested in being a CMC member. Maybe you could ask your 1st Officer what had happened. I know from past experiences that sometimes mistakes are made and we are sorry if that is the case here. I try to get hold of Fern at some point over the next couple of days as well. Glad that you are still here.
  22. viking

    User name

    Why the purge? For obvious reasons people are less active during the off season.
  23. Irma

    User name

    Hi Mikael, I show you as being purged Oct 2017 but of course you are welcome to rejoin which you have done. -Ima
  24. viking

    User name

    So, I went to login a couple of days ago and it says my user name does not exist. I have been a member since 2008, used the same name all the time. So I had to register again. What on earth was that about?
  25. Shoe

    CMC 2018 Waiver

    Your cards will be available from your 1st Officer but I believe Marie Charron is looking after it for Ottawa.
  26. Louisa Cale

    CMC 2018 Waiver

    There is an ICE card but can't see a membership card document? How do we go about getting a membership card?
  1. Load more activity